Case Study: My Experience With Booths

Costs of Adding Heat and Brake Capabilities to Non-Heated Paint Booths

Selecting the right spray paint booth is not always easy. The term can mean anything, from a plain space with a fan to a high-tech booth with a complex system and varied features. Of course, you will have to choose depending on your needs.

If you’ve been reading about spray paint booths, you may have learned that they come in different types, such as crossdraft, downdraft, semi-downdraft and side-draft. However, if you’re planning to add heat and brake capabilities to a non-heated spray paint booth, that is something that you have to seriously consider, especially the cost.

Though custom shops may not need upgrades, you may have to get one if you expect volume to be part of your business model. As you add heat to your paint booth, it’s important to be able to recycle it, saving you thousands of dollars yearly.

The cheaper the spray paint booth, the most expensive it usually is to retrofit. For example, you cannot supply heat to a cross-draft booth through its doors. That will be prohibitively expensive and it will require big alterations. In a similar way,installing a heat recycle in specific cross-draft booths can be done, but the cost will be through the roof.

Semi-downdraft booths are easier when it comes to retrofitting for the addition of heat. You will need very little metal customization or on-site work, which means installation and labor costs will be minimal.

It would be difficult and pricey to add heat recycle because of the location of the exhaust, which is at the back of the booth. Certainly, it will require a substantial amount of ductwork. When it comes to side downdraft spray paint booths, retrofitting with heat is easier since the ducts run along the sidewalls. Adding heat recycling is also as easy as the heater can be connected to the exhaust duct at any location. As to downdraft booths, heat and heat recycling can both be added easily, depending on the layout. Installation and labor costs will be minimal as changes to the cabin will be unnecessary.

In any case, make sure there’s adequate room around the booth where you decide to add heat in the future. Your building should have the appropriate electric load, and you should determine where the power will have to be run so you can see what your costs will be. Also make sure that the fuel that will run the booth can be brought to the heater. Finally, see whether your city will allow you to add a heater, even if your immediate plans do not include that yet. When you take time to look into everything, you can save your business money and time later on.

Study: My Understanding of Booths

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